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Category Archives: Macro Photography

A variety of flowers are blooming along the Red Cedar State Trail. The most common flowers are the Touch-me-nots which are blooming all along the trail.

Pale Touch-me-not

Spotted-touch-me-not

Spiderwort

Motherwort

Chickweed

Blue Verian

Blooming Grass

On a walk along the Red Cedar Trail we found a number of interesting insects including the first ever Black Swallowtail Caterpillar.

Black Swallowtail Caterpillar

Japanese Beetle

Question Mark

Millipede

 

There are a variety of flowers blooming at Hoffman Hills Recreation Area. The predominant flower is the Queen Anne’s Lace.

Queen Anne’s Lace

Purple Cone Flower

Prairie Blazing Star

Joe-pye Weed

Butterfly Weed

 

The Pale and Spotted Touch-me-nots are blooming along the Red Cedar State Trail.

Pale Touch-me-not

Spotted-touch-me-not

As part of our Dreamland safaris Tour we were taken over to Moccasin Mountain Tracksite to view tracks to view fossil track preserved in layers of Navajo Sandstone. Apparently water was hard to find in this desert. Water was seasonally available which drew animals to the ares where the wet sand formed molds which later became fossilized tracks. It took us a while to find some track but then the race was on to see who could find the most tracks. It is not something we planned on doing but it was a part of the other families tour so we went along. It was really impressive. It is a place that we might have been able to drive to but it was still at the end of a sandy road.

After our visit to the Tracksite we headed back to Kanab. It was late in the afternoon and we still had a long drive to Page, Arizona.

We had planned on hiking a couple of days in Zion but my wife didn’t like the motel we were staying at. I thought it was OK. I had planned driving down to Page and then entering the drawing to get into the Wave. However, I discovered that the Wave drawings were now being held in Kanab at the visitors center. Thus we decided to cut our visit to Zion short and drive to Kanab and stay. It was much less expensive and the hotel was excellent. That evening we had a nice meal and during the meal noticed some photos of a slot canyon in the area. We found out the locals called it Peek-a-boo Canyon We talked to the owner about it and he suggested getting a guided trip to theĀ  canyon.

That evening we checked out the canyon on the web. The next morning we headed to the visitors center for the Wave drawing. The last time I was at a drawing it was held at the Paria Contact Station. That time there were about a dozen people at the station for the drawing and it was a simple process of putting your name and the number in your party on a slip of paper which was then drawn out of a hat. When we arrived at the visitors center there were already quite a few people signed up. It was a little more complicated signup process. When the drawing took place there were over a 100 people attending. Needless to say we didn’t get a slot since there are only 10 slots available and those attending the drawing probably represented 300 people. It was a fun experience and the ranger conducting the drawing was quite funny and kept the atmosphere light. My wife took a cell phone photo during the drawing.

While we were at the visitors center we asked about Peek-a-boo Canyon. The gave us a map and suggested that we would walk in to the Canyon. It was about 4 miles on the road. We could not drive because you need an ATV or a serious 4 wheel drive vehicle to make it. We thought about hiking but finally decided to drive out to Dreamland Safari Tours and see if they could take us out. We lucked out. They had a tour booked for noon and had space for us. At this point we had a couple of hours to spare so we decided to drive out to Coral Pink Sand Dunes State Park. I had visited the Sand Dunes about fifteen years ago and thought it was great.

When we arrived at the Sand Dunes we were very disappointed to find that ATV’s and motor cycles were allowed on the dunes. In the old days they were confined to a section away from the main dunes. Now they had the run of most of the park. Nothing like going out to enjoy nature and having to dodge ATV’s and listen to them roar by. Apparently the state doesn’t have the backbone to say no to the nuts that want to race around on their ATV’s.

We noticed these deer at the edge of the dunes. The could hear the ATV’s coming.

We ended up taking photos of small sections on the dunes that had not been destroyed by the ATV’s. I have to say this will not be on our list of places to stop the next time we are in the area.

As we were driving away from the Dunes we found a large flock of American Avocet’s wading in a small wet area along the road.

 

I was a raining morning when we drove over to Pattison State Park. We had business in Superior and Pattison is just a short drive out of town. Our first stop was Big Manitou Falls. It is the fourth highest waterfall east of the Mississippi.

We then drove on to Little Manitou Falls.

This is a shot of Dam below Interfalls Lake. It almost looks like the water is interlaced with gold.

Just below the dame the Black River flows under a foot bridge.

The Orange Hawkweed were blooming in the park.

While walking along Park Point Beach we found some interesting ice formations.

It was a beautiful day so we decided to walk over to Park Point Beach and walk along the Beach. There was still a little ice around so I spent time taking photos of ice patterns.

 

The very cold weather we have seen the past few weeks is ideal for creating ice and frost. On an earlier visit to Paradise Valley and Devil’s Punchbowl I noticed that the small stream had overflowed and created a large amount of ice. This along with the cold weather created some ideal conditions to form frost feathers. Indeed the ice on the stream was covered with them. I took my macro lens along on the second visit and spent a couple of hours photographing them.

More photographs from Paradise Valley and Devil’s Punchbowl can be found on my website.

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