Skip navigation

Category Archives: Menomonie

Walking around the ice on Lake Menomin I found a few items of interest. There were a few leaves on and embedded in the ice.

I found a partially eaten Crappie on the ice. Not sure where it cam from. Once when I was watching ice fishing the fishermen were throwing the fish out on the ice and a dog was picking them up and walking away with them.

This is an old ice hole that was drilled in the ice and has since frozen over.

 

Advertisements

In Wisconsin ice fishing is a common winter sport. As soon as the ice freezes over ice fishermen can be found out on the ice. As the ice thickens and can support vehicles the fishermen drag ice shacks out on the lake. In the winter a small village can be found on the ice of Lake Menomin. I usually take at least one opportunity to wall through the village taking photos. This year it was particularly challenging to walk on the ice. Normally the ice is covered with snow but this year rained so the ice was very smooth and slippery. You will note that some of the ice houses are jacked up or placed on boards. This is done so the ice houses don’t freeze to the ice on the lake. If they do it makes it very difficult to remove them in the spring.

 

 

 

On one of the rare sunny days we have had recently I walked out on frozen Lake Menomin to take some ice photos.

 

My wife has put together an exhibit of eight of my winter photographs for the Menomonie, Wisconsin Public Library. The photos selected are shown below.

A Female Northern Cardinal taken during snowstorm.

A Bald Eagle shot at Colvill Park in Red Wing Minnesota. It was fourteen below zero.

These trees covered in ice were photographed above Lake Superior at Tettegouche State Park in Minnesota. A strong March storm roared across Minnesota and Wisconsin. The Nor’easter caused huge waves along the lake which then froze on the trees.

Bridge along the Red Cedar Trail near Downsville, Wisconsin after an early November snowfall.

An Ice formation at Devil’s Punchbowl near Menomonie, Wisconsin

Bond falls is my favorite winter waterfall destination. It is located near Paulding, Michigan in the U.P.

Trees photographed, during a winter snowstorm, while skiing the Backcountry Trail at Swedetown. Swedetown is located in Calumet, Michigan.

A rock and Ice formation along the Apostile Islands.

The Milkweed Tiger Moths are out in large numbers.

A local report on the news indicated that we have been overrun by Japanese Beetles again this year. I have been finding them out in the Prairie. Since I didn’t put a garden in this year I’ve not had to contend with the them. This pair was mating. As an indication of how devastating they can be the one beetle was eating while mating.

The Groundnut’s are blooming along the Red Cedar Trail although they seem to be blooming in different locations from past years. It is one of my favorite fall flowers.

The Spotted and Pale Touch Me Nots are in full bloom along the Red Cedar State Trail.

Spotted-Touch-me-not

Spotted Touch-me-not

Pale Touch-me-not

Pale Touch-me-not

I’ve had the opportunity to hike several sections of the Red Cedar State Trail last week. It has really been hot and muggy so my hikes have taken place early in the morning. These are a few of the things I’ve seen.

Thistle

Wild Cucumber

Leaf

False Sunflower

We have been remodeling the house for the past couple of weeks so most of my photography has been limited to the farm. However, there are lots of interesting things to photograph. The prairie has quite a few wildflowers, Butter-and-eggs, Canadian Goldenrod, Evening Primrose, Purple Coneflowers, Wild Catnip, Black-eyed Susans, and my favorite. I like because, with judicious mowing, I can photography it from early June until frost.

White Alfalfa

 

There are also an abundance of butterflies in the prairie. I have allowed a large number of milkweed plants to grow and I am seeing more Monarch Butterflies than I’ve seen in the past. There are also sulphurs, Red Admirals, Great Spangled Fritillaries and a few others.

Red Admiral

Monarch Butterfly on Alfalfa

Of course there are still summer birds around although some of them have already left. The Eastern Bluebirds and Red-breasted Grosbeaks are now gone for the season. I have at least one family of Baltimore Orioles visiting the feeder. This is the first time they have stayed around longer than a couple of weeks. In the past month they have eaten over a gallon of grape jelly. I’ve noticed several other birds partaking of the jelly as well.  I have quite a few House Finches and American Goldfinches visiting the feeder. The Ruby Throated Hummingbirds are the most abundant birds at the feeders right now and they are going through about several gallons of sugar water every week. Goldfinches and the house finches have been feeding on some catnip that I planted.

More shots from the last few weeks on the farm can be found on my website.