Skip navigation

Category Archives: Waterfalls

As I noted in an earlier blog we had tried to get to Rouse Falls a few days earlier but a threatening storm caused us to turn back. When we tried the second time we only drove in on the logging road a few hundred yards before parking. The road wasn’t good to start with and the recent rain made it impassible. As it turned out were not all that far from the Falls on the earlier attempt. It only took us about 15 minutes to walk to it on the logging road. We were a little confused because the logging road split and went up a hill. There were no signs so we tried both branches and both of them petered out in about 50 feet. We noticed a faint trail on the right fork. After about 50 feet we could hear the Falls. Photographic conditions were not very good but I managed a few photos.  I think with a little more water flow this would be a nice falls to visit on a cloudy day.

On the way back we took a few photos of the logging road. As you can see it was a wise decision not to try it in a van.

We then drove on to Wren Falls. We were a little concerned when we encountered this sign. Probably not a place you would want to visit during hunting season.

Wren falls was nice but not a lot of photography options because it is in a canyon which we were not about to climb down into.

This is a view up the Tyler Forks River.

In the afternoon we drove over to Amnicon Falls State Park and then met some friends that we met when we were in Sweden. I thought there would be more water running in the Amnicon River because there was a good flow at Pattison State Park. I was dissapointed to see a low flow with Now and Then falls just flowing.

Now and Then Falls

With the low water flow I was able to capture this photo of Snake Pit Falls.

Snake Pit Falls

This is a shot of a stick in the water at the top of lower falls.

I was a raining morning when we drove over to Pattison State Park. We had business in Superior and Pattison is just a short drive out of town. Our first stop was Big Manitou Falls. It is the fourth highest waterfall east of the Mississippi.

We then drove on to Little Manitou Falls.

This is a shot of Dam below Interfalls Lake. It almost looks like the water is interlaced with gold.

Just below the dame the Black River flows under a foot bridge.

The Orange Hawkweed were blooming in the park.

Our next stop was Tyler Forks Dells. We drove to the end of the road and then followed a faint path along the river. As we walked into the woods the path was easier to find.

As we were returning to the car we noticed two fishermen. These were the only people we say during our waterfall excursions. We then headed over toward Rouse Falls. We started driving down a logging road only to determine that we would never make it in a van so we pulled over and parked. After walking for about five minutes we noticed that the sky was getting black so we decided to give it up for the day. We were lucky that we turned back because a strong storm hit just after we hit the main road.

After leaving Foster Falls we drove over to Upson to try and find Upson Falls. I had stopped on several earlier occasions but didn’t realize that Upson Falls could not be seen from the small park and campground. After a short walk around a large outcropping of rocks we found Upson falls.

Upson Falls also had some interesting foam patterns to photograph.

When we returned to the car I took out my macro lens to photograph some of the flowers found along the Potato River.

On my birthday, I had forgotten it was my birthday, my wife and I decided to take a waterfalling trip through northern Wisconsin. Our first stop was Foster Falls. It was a beautiful sunny day, not the kind of day you want for taking waterfall photos but none the less it was a great day to drive around northern Wisconsin. Foster Falls is not all that impressive but still provided some nice photo opportunities.

After photographing the falls I noticed some nice foam patterns in the water and spent quite a bit of time photographing them.

My wife and camera assistant patiently waiting for me to finish.

This photo of interstate falls appears in the 2017-2018 Wisconsin’s Great Lakes Calendar.

Three of my photos from Big Falls County Park appear in the April/May 2017 issue of 5ive For Women magazine page 13.

The last time we drove to Duluth, Minnesota there were 40-50 mph winds blowing so we decided to continue on up the North Shore and see if we could catch some big waves. The winds were blowing from the South East and  there were no big waves. We stopped at Gooseberry Falls to check out the conditions.

Upper Falls

Upper Falls

Middle Falls

At the time I thought we should have driven to Grand Marais, Minnesota but we didn’t have time. Paul Sundberg was able to capture the furry of the storm in the harbor.

We met up with a friend in Duluth before heading up the North Shore to Split Rock Lighthouse State Park. Our goal was to hike the five mile Split Rock River Loop Trail. When we arrived at the trailhead the trail looked to be in good shape. We debated taking our ice grippers and finally decided to take them along. Good thing we did because we we encountered ice on the trail at we crested the first hill. If we didn’t have the ice grippers we would not have been able to make the hike because the trail was very icy and steep. In some places a slip would have meant a long slide down the gorge into the River.

Split Rock falls was still iced up with just a little water flowing at the bottom of the falls.

We crossed over a small stream and made our way over the the main section of the Split Rock River. The River was still mainly ice but water was flowing in some places.

In a few places the rushing water was producing foam formations one of which looked like a volcano.

As we started the hike we noticed a sign indicating that the foot bridge over the Split Rock River was closed. Last spring when we hiked this trail the bridge looked like it wasn’t safe but we still used it. It looked like the park service had cut the bridge down because only the footings on either side of the river were still standing. We walked down the river a short distance before finding a snow bridge over the river. You can see a portion of the bridge in the background.

We were happy to make it over the river because returning on the same trail would have been difficult because of the ice conditions. There were still some icy conditions on the trail but it wasn’t nearly as bad as the hike up.

As we emerged from the forest we had a great view of Lake Superior. The wind was blowing at about 25 miles an hour out of the East and there were some nice waves hitting the shore. We decided to drive over to the Split Rock Lighthouse and check out the waves.