Skip navigation

While walking along Park Point Beach we found some interesting ice formations.

It was a beautiful day so we decided to walk over to Park Point Beach and walk along the Beach. There was still a little ice around so I spent time taking photos of ice patterns.

 

It’s the end of the winter and the ice along the Red Cedar State Trail is starting to rot. The trail is not in the best of shape during the transition from winter to spring. Folks have been walking on it a are making a mess. We manage to walk along the edge where there was solid footing.

We took a drive down to Devil’s Punchbowl and Paradise Valley to check out the ice. Not much going on at the Punchbowl but the warm weather and running water at Paradise Valley produced some nice edge ice. It was a little tricky getting across the stream because there has been quite a bit of water running this winter. I did find out from a friend that what I have been calling Paradise Valley does have a more specific name. It’s called Tripp Falls Ravine. More photos from Trip Falls Ravine can be found on my website.

paradise-valley-17-3-0009

ice-formations-paradise-valley-17-3-0036

ice-formations-paradise-valley-17-3-0018

ice-formations-paradise-valley-17-3-0095

We drove over to Hudson, Wisconsin to check on conditions at Willow River State Park and to see if the Trumpeter Swans were still around. The Swans were gone as was the ice on the river. There was very little ice at Willow Falls but I notice on the walk in there were some interesting ice formations along a branch of the river. It was a steep climb down to the river but it was worth the effort.

ice-formations-willow-river-state-park-17-2-4273

ice-formations-willow-river-state-park-17-2-4279

ice-formations-willow-river-state-park-17-2-4363

It looks like the river was higher and when it receded it left a ring of ice on the trees. The first photo shows where a Beaver has been working on the tree. If you look close you can see the teeth marks.

ice-formations-willow-river-state-park-17-2-4321

ice-formations-willow-river-state-park-17-2-4318

When I first started photographing birds I had to do it from my basement window because I didn’t have the right lenses to photograph them at the feeders. The birds would go to the feeders to get seeds then fly to a lilac bush by the basement window to eat them. This made it easy to get some close shots. Over the years I acquired better lenses and started photographing from my large windows by the feeders. I recently went back to my roots and spent the better part of a day photographing from my basement window.

Dark-eyed Juncos were around in large numbers after being absent for part of the winter.

dark-eyed-junco-17-2-3837

dark-eyed-junco-17-2-3884

Black-capped Chickadees were around in large numbers. This seemed to be their favorite perch for eating.

black-capped-chickadee-17-2-3814

black-capped-chickadee-17-2-3834

There were also a few Northern Cardinals around but they were a little skittish and wouldn’t come near the window.

northern-cardinal-17-2-4187

northern-cardinal-17-2-4165

At least what passes for a blizzard this year. It snowed all day and we had some strong winds but only about 6 inches of snow. When we do get a snow storm it seems to bring the Northern Cardinals out in good numbers. On this day I was lucky to get more than the the usually number of shots of female Cardinals.

northern-cardinal-17-2-4136

northern-cardinal-17-2-4128

northern-cardinal-17-1-2895

northern-cardinal-17-1-2912

northern-cardinal-17-2-4134

As we were leaving Duluth to head back home we stopped at Amnicon Falls to look around. I didn’t think we would take any photos but this was the first time I had seen large amounts of foam at the bottom of lower falls.

horton-covered-bridge-amnicon-falls-state-park-17-2-2661

lower-falls-amnicon-falls-state-park-17-2-2691

amnicon-falls-state-park-17-2-2694

Having given up on walking on the ice to the brownstone caves we decided to return to our original plan and drive over to Lost Creek Falls. This was to be our first time hiking to the falls in the winter. With the unusually warm conditions we figured there would be some water running over the falls. We had a great time at the falls. It was a great hike in and the falls offers a little seclusion and an opportunity to reflect. More photos from Lost Creek Falls can be found on my website.

lost-creek-falls-17-2-2562

lost-creek-falls-17-2-2598

lost-creek-falls-17-2-2604

After the race I asked one of the officials where the brownstone caves were located. He pointed out how to reach them. We joined up with a friend from Bayfield and started walking out on the ice toward the caves. We encountered this small island before we had gone very far.

brown-stone-formations-chequamegon-bay-washburn-wisconsin-17-2-2502

There were some large pressure ridges on the lake and open water where they had been formed. We had to do some back tracking to find places to cross them.

chequamegon-bay-washburn-wisconsin-17-2-2514

ice-formations-chequamegon-bay-washburn-wisconsin-17-2-2529

As the temperatures warmed we noticed more water on the ice. We also encountered some large cracks in the ice and decided this probably was not the best day to be making this trip. We decided to add the brownstone caves to our list of things to do on a cold winter day.

ice-formations-chequamegon-bay-washburn-wisconsin-17-2-2547

ice-patterns-chequamegon-bay-washburn-wisconsin-17-2-2493