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Category Archives: Bird Photography

With the arrival of summer birds start bringing their fledglings to the bird feeders. Here a House Finch is feeding its insistent fledgling.

A male Northern Cardinal is feeding its fledgling.

A Downy Woodpecker feeds its fledgling.

This House Sparrow Fledgling was sitting at the feeder waiting for a parent to arrive. He was a stitch to watch because he kept falling asleep and almost falling off of the perch.

This Downy Woodpecker fledgling was alone at the feeder for quite some time and seemed to be bewildered by all of the activity at the feeder.

 

The Rose-breasted Grosbeaks are eating most of my sunflower seeds.

Helping the Grosbeaks are the American Goldfinches. They are also eating most of the thistle seeds.

At the start of summer the Baltimore Orioles were absent from the feeders while they raised their young. They have now returned with their young.

Red-bellied Woodpeckers have been at the feeders all summer eating   suet, sunflower seeds and grape jelly.Downy woodpeckers have also been at the feeders.

The Grey Catbirds have a nest near the feeders and spend a lot of time eating grape jelly.

Mourning Doves spend a lot of time under the feeders cleaning up the mess.

Northern Cardinals are around year around.

Typically when we drive out to Wisconsin Point in the summer we are able to spot some Bald Eagles. On our last trip we saw over a dozen of them. There were five of them in one tree. It looked like the two adults along with their three fledglings. It was by far our best day of eagle watching at Wisconsin Point.

My wife and I frequently walk down to Canal Park in Duluth, Minnesota to watch the ships arrive. On this night we were able to catch two ships as they arrived about an hour apart. The first to arrive was the Baie Comeau flying the Canadian Flag.

Between ships we walked out to the North Breakwater Light. There have been a large number of Double-breasted Cormorants hanging around the harbor this year.

There was some nice light and clouds behind the North Breakwater Light.

We watched the Herbert C. Jackson approach the ship canal.

Throughout the evening there were some interesting lake/sky photos.

 

My wife always carries some peanuts when we go down to Canal Park in Duluth to watch the ships. Between ships she feeds the gulls peanuts. It’s great fun to watch them.

We made a late spring visit to Crex Meadows last week. Our first stop was a Bald Eagle nest on Phantom Lake Road. One of the adults was sitting by the nest and there were two young in the nest. It looked like they were just about ready to leave the nest.

When we reached Phantom Lake we found a number of pairs of Canada Geese with their young. This adult seemed to be upset with something and it kept chasing other geese.

There were a number of pairs of Trumpeter Swans with their young. The adults were furiously churning the water. I assume to free plants from the bottom so they would float to the surface and the Cygnets could feed on them.

One of the popular attractions this year has been Killdeer nesting in the roads around the flowage.

We also found this Leatherback Turtle laying eggs along the road.

The spring flowers were out in the meadows. Indian Paintbrush and Yellow Water Lilies were common.

We encountered a number of White-tailed Deer in our drive through the meadows.

The young ducks have also hatched and could be found on the flowages.

Just as we were about to leave on vacation the orioles and hummingbirds returned for the summer. We only saw a couple of them but knew more would be following. We put out a couple of large containers of grape jelly for the orioles and all of my feeders for the humming birds. When we returned the orioles had eaten all of the grape jelly and the humming birds had just about emptied their feeders. I put out some grape jelly and filled the humming bird feeders but there have only been a few around. Typically they come and eat for a week or two then go off to raise their young. I would expect to see them back in large numbers as summer begins.

Orchard Oriole

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

We were leaving for a three week vacation but before we left we stopped out at Hoffman Hills to check to see if the Canada Geese had hatched. The nest was empty but it looked like one of the goslings had not survived. The remaining goslings were paddling around the pond.

The Eastern Bluebirds and the Tree Swallows were battling it out for housing.

The trees wee starting to leaf out.

There is a small pond along the road on the adjoining farm. As we drove past it we noticed a Bald Eagle circling so we decided to stop for a photo. Unfortunately it went behind the hill so I started photographing a pair of Wood Ducks in the pond. I noticed my wife waving at me and pointing. Turned out the Eagle had returned.

This spring two birds have turned up at my feeders that I have never seen on the farm before. The firs photo is of an Eastern Toehee. When it first turned up I thought the Baltimore Orioles had returned but I was wrong. A pair of Toehees spend their time feeding on the ground and running from under the feeder to a bush that provides shelter. The second bird is the Yellow-rumped Warbler which also turned up a few weeks ago. There are a number of them and they seem to like to feed on the suet.

A bird that I have not seen for several years also turned up at the feeder last week. The Red-breasted Nuthatch used to frequent my feeders and finally returned after an absence.

I still have lots of White-throated Sparrows around. Fortunately they are ground feeders and seem to do a good job cleaning up under the feeders.

Last week the male Rose-breasted Grosbeaks  returned. I have not yet seen the females. The only spring birds that have not returned are the Ruby-throated Hummingbirds and the Baltimore Orioles.

Rose-breasted Grosebeak