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Category Archives: Ship Photography

It was mid afternoon when we finished doing some shopping. As we were driving down toward the harbor in Duluth we noticed that a ship had just gone under the Aerial Lift Bridge. It was the Kaye E. Barker which we had seen over in Frasier Shipyards earlier in the day. It was the first ship to leave Duluth for the season. Since it didn’t have any cargo I was wondering where it was going. I checked Marine Tracker and saw that it was headed for Two Harbors to pick up a load of taconite.  I also noticed that it was being escorted to Two Harbors by the Mackinaw. It was a beautiful day so we decided to drive up to Two Harbors and catch the action.

On the way up we took photos of the two ships.

The Mackinaw arrived first and promptly sailed into the harbor to start breaking ice.

I’m always amazed at the number of people who come down to the harbor to watch the ships come in.

When the Mackinaw was finished breaking ice it sailed out into Lake Superior to break a trail to the Soo Locks. The next day the ice shifted and a couple of ships were caught in the ice. The Alder had to sail up from Duluth to free them. The Kaye E. Barker had been waiting out in the lake. When the Mackinaw finished it slowly sailed into the harbor and worked its way into the docks. There was a tug in the harbor but it made it without any assistance.

 

 

 

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This was the second time we had the good fortune to be at Frasier Shipyards when tugs were working to break out the ships from winter layup. We had planed to drive over to Frasier Shipyards to take a few photos of the ships that were in winter layup and in for repair. When we arrived we discovered that a tug was working to free the ships from the ice so they could begin the shipping season. The Kaye E. Barker had already been freed from the ice

The Tug North Carolina was working to free  the Lee A. Tregurtha.

The Tim S. Dool was in Frasier for major overhaul,

The William A. Irvin was moved to Frasier from its dock in Duluth last fall for a much needed refurbishing. It is a major tourist attraction in Duluth.

One last shot of the ships as the tug was finishing its work.

The morning following the arrival of the icebreakers in Duluth I walked down to the harbor to take a few photos of the Mackinaw. It was tied up at the docks next to the convention center. I took a few photos but there didn’t seem to be much activity so I started walking back to the condo. I happen to hear the Mackinaw blow it horn so I walked back down to the harbor.

 

Sure enough it was already out in the harbor and it looked like it was heading to Wisconsin Point. I hightailed it back to the condo to get the car and started driving down toward Wisconsin Point.

At a stop sign I checked on Marine Tracker and discovered that the Mackinaw was already headed back toward Duluth. It was really moving it out. I pulled into Barkers Island Just in time to get some photos of it breaking ice in Superior Bay on it’s way back to Duluth. I Followed it on Marine Tracker for a while and decided that it was done for the day.

 

We happened to be in Duluth, Minnesota a few weeks ago when the Icebreakers arrived. It was late in the day and there was a large crowd on hand to greet the ships. The US Coast Guard Cutter Mackinaw was the first to arrive. It is the largest Coast Guard Cutter working in the great lakes. It typically come to Duluth to break ice prior to the start of the shipping season.

 

The Mackinaw was followed by the US Coast Guard Cutter Alder. The Alder’s home base is Duluth and there were a number of family members on hand to greet the crew. Apparently the Alter had been away from port for a while breaking ice around the Soo Locks.

 

 

On a recent trip to Duluth we noticed that the Neah Bay was in the harbor so we walked down to take a look at it. I don’t believe I have photographed this ship before.

 

My photo of the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Alder is featured in the Lake Superior 2019 Calendar published by Lake Superior Magazine. It shows the Alder on a winter run to break ice at Wisconsin Point Lighthouse.

Coast Guard Cutter Alder

The following day we managed to catch another Duluth Shipping Twofer. The American Integrity was coming into Duluth Harbor and the Paul R. Tregurtha  was on its way out into Lake Superior.

The American Integrity had a good deal of ice on its bow.

The Paul R. Tregurtha was listing to one side as it made its turn to line up with the Ship Canal. Several years ago it lost steering and grounded itself at Bayfront Park.

When someone goes down to Canal Park to watch a ship come in and two ships come in and/or go out it is called a twofer. On this particular day the Michipicoten was coming in.

The Walter J. McCarthy, Jr. was on its way out of the harbor.

We walked down to the Duluth Ship Canal to watch the Paul R. Tregurtha sail under the Aerial Lift Bridge. Our first stop was to photograph the South Breakwater Inner Light with the interesting clouds behind it.

We then walked over to the DECC to watch the Tregurtha arrive and sail into the harbor.

My wife and I frequently walk down to Canal Park in Duluth, Minnesota to watch the ships arrive. On this night we were able to catch two ships as they arrived about an hour apart. The first to arrive was the Baie Comeau flying the Canadian Flag.

Between ships we walked out to the North Breakwater Light. There have been a large number of Double-breasted Cormorants hanging around the harbor this year.

There was some nice light and clouds behind the North Breakwater Light.

We watched the Herbert C. Jackson approach the ship canal.

Throughout the evening there were some interesting lake/sky photos.