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Tag Archives: Sørenga Norway

One of our favorite walks while visiting Oslo was along the harbor. Oslo now has a harbor walk that covers about five miles along the harbor.

Generally we started our walk in Sørenga. This is a relatively new area and features many restaurants and cafes. It is probably best know for its saltwater swimming pool featuring a beach, children’s pool and a large recreational area. The areas is open to the public year around.

 

Sørenga is connected to Bjørvika by a floating bridge. The Bjørvika area us undergoing a huge renovation transforming from a container port to an arts center. It is the home of the Oslo Opera House, a new library and a huge housing development.

Munch Museum

Deichman Library

Just across the fjord from the Opera House is a popular location for kayakers although most of those we saw seemed to be practicing how to get back in the kayak.

This was also an area where we notice several floating saunas that could be rented.

 

A short distance down the harbor we found SALT is a nomadic art project with pyramidal constructions called “hesjer”, which are based on traditional coastal construction methods. It appears to be modeled after traditional fish drying racks. It will be in Oslo until 2020. This area also houses the cruise line terminals.

Vippetangen used to be a fish market and now houses a food and entertainment area.

In back of the current commercial seafood market we frequently found fishermen hanging out. I don’t ever recall anyone catching any fish.

Akershus Fortress dominates the eastern side of the harbor. Outside Akershus Fortress cruise ships were normally tied up. One day we noticed a US warship tied up and guards and security all around the area.

Moving westward along the harbor we encountered Police boats, and tour boats before reaching the City Hall and Oslo City Harbor. In this area you will find the ferries that serve the island in the Oslo fjord. It also houses the Noble Peace Center.

Oslo City Hall sits at the head of the harbor. If you ever get a chance it is well worth taking a tour. This area has symbolic significance, as this is where the royal family arrived in spring of 1945, after five years as war refugees in London.

Oslo City Hall

The area also serves as a major transportation hub of the central harbor area.

Ferry Terminal serving the Oslo Fjord.

A street Performer in front of the Noble Peace Center

Oslo Peace Center

Sad to say but this passes as the Oslo public fish market.

Aker brygge was the first are development in the old dock along the harbor. It is part of the city center and is noted for its pier and eateries. In the summer most everyone is eating outdoors. Ferries also depart for the Oslo Fjord. The area also houses the Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art. It offers great views of Akershus Fortress and pleasure boat docks.

Tjuvholmen is a neighborhood located on a peninsula sticking out from Aker Brygge into the Oslo Fjord. It is one of the first areas of harbor development and a very expensive area. In addition to housing it includes trendy shops, a bathing area and a sculpture park.

Continuing west on the harbor Promenade we find Filipstad. Currently Filipstad houses cruise lines, industrial facilities and a recreational boat harbor. This is the next area of the Oslo waterfront that is slated for development. The goal is to make the harbor more accessible for the citizens of Oslo and visitors.

As you reach the end of the harbor walk the area is next to a major highway and is more open. There is a park with exercise equipment and a skateboard facility. A number of adults were using it of the day we walked by.

It is possible to continue walking past the end of the Harbor Walk all the way to Bygdøy where some of the major museums are located.

 

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In the morning we took the metro out to Kolsås, Norway with the goal of hiking up Kolsåstoppen. There was some construction on the metro line so we had to switch trains at Majorstuen.

More photos from Norway can be found on my website.

When we reached Kolsås we wandered around a while looking for the hiking trail to Kolsåstoppen. As is typically the case the instructions for the hike weren’t the best. We finally notice a really small sign on a lamp post. The trail seemed to take us through a residential area before heading into the woods.

We hiked for about a half an hour before I decided to call it quits. It was really hot and I don’t do all that well in hot weather. I told my wife to go on and I would wait for her but she decided she would turn back with me. As we neared the start of the trail we became lost once again. We recognized some of the landmarks but it seemed that just about every house in the neighborhood had started their own trail to the main trail so it was almost impossible to find the main trail. My wife said it was OK to walk through someones yard in Norway but I didn’t feel comfortable doing it. In the USA you would like get shot doing something like that. Fortunately we did find the trail and made out way back to the metro station.

On a positive note we found the bakery I had been looking for since arriving in Oslo. On our first day in Oslo we were trying to find the metro ticked office and I spotted a beautiful bakery. Unfortunately we were not able to find it again no matter how hard we looked. I had finally concluded that I imagined the whole thing. We were wandering around in Central Station and there it was the Bit Byporten .

We then walked over to Sørenga. The area between the barcode buildings and Sørenga is under heavy development. In the second photo the new Munch Museum can be seen. The last photo shows development along the Akerselva River. It was a warm day and many folks were floating down the river into Oslo Fjord.

We walked past the new Munch Museum and walked over a floating walkway to Sørenga. Until recently Oslo the city was separated from Oslo the Fjord by highways and industry. About 20 years ago a Fjord City Master plan was developed to bring connect the city to the waterfront by placing highways under the city and removing dilapidated harbor properties. Some development had taken place before the master plan for example Aker Brygge and the Barcode Project. Sørenga is designed to be a self contained community with trendy restaurants, grocery stores and schools.

The views of the new Munch Museum and the barcode project are spectacular from Sørenga.

As I noted it was a beautiful warm day and many folks were out catching the rays of the sun. A large free public space offers floating jetties, a beach, diving boards, outdoor showers, separate children’s pool, grassy areas, a 50-metre pool with lanes, and a 200 sq metre seawater pool and it is all free and open to the public.

A couple of kids were paddling around without adult supervision. I had trouble figuring out why I took the second photo but when I looked at it closely I noticed that someone had a fishing pole out over the water from the second floor condo.

Lots of folks were floating the Akerselva River out into the Oslo Fjord.