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Tag Archives: Oslo Opera House

During our stay in Oslo we had walked past and into the Opera House on a number of occasions. They had public restrooms so it was a convenient stop. On our last visit we decided to take a tour of the Opera House. It was well worth the time.

More photos of the Oslo Opera House can be found on my website.

The wide walkways round the Opera House offer a great stage and seating for public events.

The floating She Lies Sculpture can be seen from the Opera House.

In the lobby there is a restaurant, a glass sculpture depicting a glacier and the wooden facade of the performance area.

The back stage ares were very interesting. They had a number of performance stages as well as rooms where sets and costumes were under construction for the upcoming season.

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My wife had visited the Hadeland Glassverks Factory many years ago when she was a student in Norway. We had been in Scandinavia for about a month at this point and during that time she had been a little obsessed about getting out to the factory. Just about every time we were at the visitors center she would ask about it. Each time they explained that it was a difficult place to visit using public transportation. She spent a good amount of time over two days plotting how to get to the factory. The day finally arrived to begin our great adventure. We started off the day with some fresh Raspberries which we had picked the day before.

More photos from Norway can be found on my website.

We took the train to Gardermoen Airport. When we arrived we asked where we could pick up the bus for the Hadeland Glassverks Factory. A friendly person at the information booth gave us we could take bus 260 and told us when and where we could catch it. We found the bus stop and waited. About 10 minutes after the scheduled departure a mini bus pulled up to the departure point and a few people got on. The bus didn’t have a number and the sign in the drivers side window said Gardermoen Airport. After about 10 minutes my wife asked the driver if he stopped at Hadeland Glassverks. Turns out it was one of his stops and it would be about a 45 minute drive. It was a nice drive through the countryside.

We asked the driver to let us know when we arrived at the factory. The bus stop was only a short distance from the but stop but it was out of sight. We spent several hours at the factory. They had animals and places for kids to play. Clearly this is a place that people drive to. We were the only ones that took the bus everyone else drove.

The glass works was founded in 1762 and the initial production used skilled craftsmen from Germany. The production was mainly medicine jars and bottles and some household glass. In the mid 1800’s production switched to household items such as crystal, wine glasses and dishes. In the 1920’s it started developing its own designs. It is the oldest industrial company that can claim continuous operations since its founding. Today most of its production is done overseas but they still maintain a group of artisans that operate on site at the visitors center.

We watched them blow glass and visitors were allowed to blow their own glass.

I think the real goal was to purchase something from the factory outlet. The fact that we were traveling light with only a backpack for the 2 month visit to Scandinavia limited what we could purchase. We ended up with some small glass birds.

 

We thought we found the bus stop to catch the bus back to Gardermoen Airport. There was a small sign that indicated the bus stopped at this location but buses came and went. Finally my wife notice a mini bus approaching at a high rate of speed. She knew that, if you wanted a bus to stop you had to flag it down. She stepped out and waved it down. Fortunately she did or we would probably still be standing waiting for the bus. Back at Gardermoen we caught the train into Oslo Central.

It was late in the day but we still had plenty of light so we decided to walk over to the Opera House. The new Deichman Library is being built next to the Opera House.

We had never walked to the top before so we decided to do that. From the top we had a good view of the new Munch Museum which is being built behind the Opera House. We also had an excellent view of the many apartments and condos that were being build in the area. There were construction cranes everywhere. This is clearly going to be the new trendy area in Oslo.

This is a shot toward toward the central harbor area of Oslo.

 

 

 

 

We met up with Linda’s cousin, Tonje, and toured sights around Oslo. First we took a tram up to Ekeberg Sculpture Park. On the way to the park we encountered a group of children out for a stroll.

The Sculpture Park was great place with some interesting sculptures some of them rather graphic.

 

The spring wildflowers were out in the park. They seem to be some of the same flowers I had been photographing before I left for Norway. Maybe that is why the Norwegians came to the Midwest.

The views from the Sculpture Park were very good. If we had a better day they would have been spectacular.

We walked down from the park and past Oslo Hospital. Just past the hospital we walked past the Ruins of Clemenskirken.

As we entered the harbor area there were construction cranes everywhere. The harbor area is undergoing a major revitalization. The goal is to create an environment where people can live and work in the area as well as a place that tourists will want to visit. In addition to the new buildings that are going up the city is removing parking ramps. The goal is to discourage people from bringing their car into the city. The major roads through the city are being placed underground.

The next stop was the Oslo Opera House. For some reason Scandinavians love large glass building for their opera houses. It is a great place for outdoor concerts although I would think it would be a little warm during the day.

A renovated office building with walkways, shops and restaurants nearby.

A sculpture in the harbor next to the Opera House.

We walked through part of the Akershus fortress complex. It is still a military base but the public is welcome. There are museums and war memorials as well as a prison and castle on the grounds.

There was a large cruise ship next to the fort. I had to take a panorama in order to get the full ship in the photo.

Oslo city hall which is often referred to as the “brown cheeses” due to its blocky exterior (Norwegian geitost or goat cheese is brown and blocky).

We took at ferry out to one of the many islands in Oslo fjord. This is Hovedoya (Main Island). The Cistercian monastery, Hovedøya Abbey, was built on the island, and opened on 18 May 1147. These are some of the ruins.

Cannons on Hovedoya Island with Oslo in the background.


Lindøya island Idyllic island in the Oslo Fjord with around 300 summer cottages in red, yellow and green. I suspect they are quite pricy since they are just a short ferry ride from Oslo.

On the ferry ride back to Oslo we had a great view of a cruise ship in the harbor as well as some nice views of the harbor.

When we returned to Oslo Tonje headed home to make our dinner and we headed back to our Airbnb. Before parting Tonje suggested an app that allowed us to access public transportation schedules. Wow did it work great. Wherever we were in the city we could indicate where we wanted to go and it listed all of the transportation options, where to connect with them and their schedule. With one exception, we only had to wait 5 minutes to catch a ride to our destination. Good public transportation is great!

In the evening we took the train out to their Tonje’s condo. Really nice. Their condo was at the end of the train line. All we had to do was walk up to the Plaza and their place was right there.