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Tag Archives: Great Lakes Shipping

I was down at the Duluth, Minnesota Harbor to watch the finish of the NorthShore Inline Marathon when I noticed the Mesabi Miner leaving the harbor. I became engrossed in watching the ship and almost missed the elite inline skaters finish the race. This was also the weekend of the Le Festival des Montgolfières  which is Duluth’s balloon festival. A couple of years ago during this same weekend the Mesabi Miner had a steering problem and didn’t make the turn. As a result it ran aground at Bayfront Park during the festival.

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Every winter I try to drive around and photograph the ships that are spending winter layup in Duluth. This year there are seven ships that will be spending the winter in Duluth. They will remain in port until about the third week in March when the tugs will start freeing them from the winter ice. Most of them will undergo some maintenance work. This year the Herbert C. Jackson will spend six months in Fraser Shipyards where it will be repowered with state-of-the-art diesel engines.

Edwin H. Gott At Port Terminal

Edwin H. Gott At Port Terminal

 

Philip R. Clarke At Port Terminal

Philip R. Clarke At Port Terminal

 

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Paul R. Tregurtha At Midwest Energy

 

Indiana-Harbor-At-Embridge Docks

Indiana Harbor At Embridge Docks

 

-Herbert-C-Jackson-At-Fraser-Shipyards

Herbert C Jackson At Fraser Shipyards

 

American-Century-At-Port-Terminal

American Century At Port Terminal

Every time we drive up the Minnesota North Shore we stop at Two Harbors to see if there is any ship activity. A couple of weeks ago we lucked out. It was a foggy morning and just as we pulled into the harbor parking lot we saw the Edger B. Speer backing out of the docks.

Edgar B. Speer

Edgar B. Speer

The first time I saw ships coming into Two Harbors I thought tug boats would be required to move them into and out of the harbor. I was wrong. Even the thousand foot ships are able to maneuver into and out of the docks without assistance. It does take them quite a while but they are routinely able to do it without problems.

Edgar B. Speer

Edgar B. Speer

We watched the Speer exit the harbor into the fog. The Speer kept blowing its fog horn and we could hear an answering response from out in the lake but, because of the fog, could not see another ship.

Edgar B. Speer

Edgar B. Speer

We waited a while hoping the other ship would come into the harbor before deciding to drive back to where the Edna G tugboat was docked and photographed the Army Corps of Engineers dredging the docs.

Edna G

Edna G

We decided to drive back to the harbor and see if the ship that was waiting outside the harbor was going to come in. Just as we drove past the fog cleared enough so we could see the Indiana Harbor steaming into the harbor.

Indiana Harbor

Indiana Harbor

We walked down to the water’s edge and watched it maneuver into the dock area. It is a slow process for one of these large ships to work its way into the docks. A lone kayaker was out in the harbor watching the ship come in.

Indiana Harbor

Indiana Harbor

Indiana Harbor

Indiana Harbor