Skip navigation

Tag Archives: Covill Park

This past week we made our last trip looking for large birds. Our initial visit was to Reads Landing along the Mississippi River. We saw a few Bald Eagles but nothing like what we has seen earlier in the year. As we were arriving one flew up into a tree right in front of the car. Just as I was getting out of the car a long train came by and the bird took off. There were also a family of Trumpeter Swans just off shore. There was a lot more open water than there was two weeks ago.

We then headed to Covill Park in Red Wing. On the way we saw a number of Bald Eagles in the Lake Pepin area. When we arrived at Covill Park the temperature was about 40 degrees warmer than it was on our last trip. There was also a lot more open water.Bald-Eagles-14-2-_1391

Most of the Eagles remained on the opposite shore. I noticed two mature eagles sitting in a tree and took their picture. The male seemed to be whispering sweet nothings in the females ear. The next thing I knew they were mating.Bald-Eagles-14-2-_1398

Speaking of mating one pair of eagles in Minnesota has already mated and has started laying eggs. It’s a bit early. This same pair laid their eggs in January last year and the eggs froze and they abandon the nest. They seem to be getting a little closer to getting it right this year. You can follow them on the Minnesota DNR webcam.

A few eagles were fishing but when they caught something they attracted a lot of friends. I suppose it is like winning the lottery you find a lot more friends than you knew you had. The bird with the fish usually ended up dropping it resulting in a skirmish on the ground.Bald-Eagles-14-2-_1468

In between watching the eagles I also watched the many ducks in the area. While I was watching a truck pulled up and all of the ducks started toward shore. Apparently someone comes every day to feed the ducks. There was also a Redheaded Duck hanging around but it was not interested in feeding along shore.Mallard-Duck-14-2-_1430

Redheaded-Duck-14-2-_1456

After lunch we headed up to Hudson to check on the Trumpeter Swans. There was a lot more open water this time. We could see open water on the other side of the river and the swans seemed to be going back and forth between the two areas. There were also a lot more Canada Geese this time. Until the swans and geese are together you have a hard time appreciating the difference in size.Swans-and-Geese-14-2-_1716

Trumpeter-Swans-14-2-_1726